Adventures in
Costa Rica

Costa Rica Tours

When you're travelling on a Costa Rica adventure tour, binoculars should be top of your packing list. Costa Rica has an incredible number of different habitats in its small area, from rainforests and cloud forests, to dry tropical and temperate forests, to mangroves, to active volcanoes, to hot sandy Caribbean and Pacific beaches, to high forest-clad mountains, and marshy lowlands. This diversity of landscapes combined with a rich variety of flora and fauna makes Costa Rica adventure tours a must-do in the world for nature lovers.

In terms of plant species are some 1,500 species of orchids alone. The animals are equally impressive with elusive jaguars roaming the forests and wonderful birds like green and scarlet macaws soaring majestically above the canopy. Toucans, howler monkeys, squirrel monkeys and tapir are also among the stars of Costa Rica's animal kingdom, while brightly coloured poison dart frogs can be found in various lurid colours. Humpback whales can be seen breaching the seas during their annual migration. Our Costa Rica adventure tours provide adrenaline seekers with a myriad of options to choose from, including canopy zip line tours, river kayaking, surfing, white water rafting, snorkelling and scuba diving, visits to sea turtle nesting sites (seasonal) and many other excursions. Highlights of a Costa Rica adventure tour may include the capital, San José, Arenal Volcano, Monteverde Cloud Forest, Manuel Antonio National Park and Tortuguero National Park to name just a few.

Featured Tours

All Tours of Costa Rica

Open Filters

12 Tours

Display By:
Sort By:

Added to
Shortlist
Route: San Jose to Panama City
Code:
TCP
Days:
7
Style: Worldwide Adventures
From:
US$869
View Tour

Added to
Shortlist
20%
OFF
NCR
Route: San José to San José
Code:
NCR
Days:
9
Style: Worldwide Adventures
On Sale! US$1,009
From:
US$807
View Tour

Added to
Shortlist
Route: San José to San José
Code:
TCS
Days:
9
Style: Worldwide Adventures
From:
US$969
View Tour

Added to
Shortlist
15%
OFF
CER
Route: San José to San José
Code:
CER
Days:
14
Style: Worldwide Adventures
On Sale! US$1,579
From:
US$1,342
View Tour

Added to
Shortlist
Route: San José to Panama City
Code:
CEP
Days:
14
Style: Worldwide Adventures
From:
US$1,759
View Tour

Added to
Shortlist
Route: San Jose to San Jose
Code:
TCRA
Days:
14
Style: Tailor-made Tours
From:
US$2,289
View Tour

Added to
Shortlist
Route: Antigua to San José
Code:
XGJ
Days:
15
Style: Worldwide Adventures
From:
US$1,729
View Tour

Added to
Shortlist
Route: San Jose to Panama City
Code:
TMPA
Days:
15
Style: Tailor-made Tours
From:
US$2,069
View Tour

Added to
Shortlist
Route: Antigua to San José
Code:
XGS
Days:
23
Style: Worldwide Adventures
From:
US$2,699
View Tour

Added to
Shortlist
Route: Playa Del Carmen to San José
Code:
MCJ
Days:
24
Style: Worldwide Adventures
From:
US$2,789
View Tour

Added to
Shortlist
Route: Antigua to Panama City
Code:
XGP
Days:
28
Style: Worldwide Adventures
From:
US$3,429
View Tour

Added to
Shortlist
Route: Mexico City to Panama City
Code:
MMP
Days:
49
Style: Worldwide Adventures
From:
US$5,779
View Tour

Costa Rica Travel Articles, Inspiration & Information

What to do in Monteverde Cloud Forest

From the moment we arrive, there is not a minute to waste, as there is such a wealth of activities in this natural playground that our biggest dilemma is how to fit it all in!  In order to ease the burden of such a decision I always single out the following 5 activities to be what I consider the “best of Monteverde”.. Read more

Slothing around Costa Rica

My mind was made up, it was time to meet a sloth. I’d been to Central America before, and been to South America, but I’d never experienced a sloth sighting. Desperate times call for desperate decisions and so I was on my way to Costa Rica with the express intent on seeing at least one sloth..  Read more

The Top 8 Experiences In Costa Rica

Costa Rica is the country on everyone’s lips at the moment. Direct flights from London to Costa Rica are just around the corner, so whether you’re trying to beat the rush or take advantage of the direct service, this laid-back Central American country has something for everyone. Read more

Independently Verified Travel Reviews From Past Clients

Costa Rica Travel Guide

Costa Rica Travel Guide

Brief history

Costa Rica has had democratic elections since the 19th century and is now one of the most peaceful nations in the world. Armed forces were abolished in 1948 and the country has avoided much of the troubles faced by other Central American nations. Sometimes dubbed the "Switzerland of Central America", its citizens enjoy one of the highest life expectancy levels in the Western hemisphere and higher living standards than its neighbours. Although still a largely agricultural country, it has expanded its economy to include strong technology and ecotourism sectors.

Geography and weather

Costa Rica is the second smallest country in Central America after El Salvador. It is bordered by Nicaragua and Panama, and has coastlines on the Caribbean and the Pacific. A low, thin line of hills between Lake Nicaragua and the Pacific reaches into northern Costa Rica, broadening and rising into high, rugged mountains in the centre and south. The capital city, San José, lies in a central basin set in these highlands.

Costa Rica's weather is influenced by altitude. The Pacific coast is drier while the Atlantic coast has the most rainfall - about 300 days a year. The temperature in San José ranges from a high of 27°C to a low of 14°C. The wet season is from May to October. The hottest months are March and April. Check the weather chart on our website or visit www.worldclimate.com to get an idea of what the weather will be like on your tour.

Visit www.worldclimate.com to get an idea of what the weather will be like on your tour.

Jungle Wildlife

If your tour includes a visit to a jungle/rainforest region you should be prepared to encounter an array of wildlife – including many insects and spiders etc. Most creepy crawlies are completely harmless and will cause you no problems at all – in fact this is all part of the jungle experience. If you find something it your room it certainly doesn't mean that the room is unclean – rather that you are in the jungle and it is completely normal. If you are uncomfortable with creepy crawlies it is a good idea to bring plenty of insect repellent spray and coils to place in your room and of course don't leave any food lying around.

Visas

Most nationals do not need a visa to enter Costa Rica, but it is important to check the rules for your nationality with your nearest embassy or consulate. Entry is granted on production of a passport valid for more than six months and proof of funds to support yourself (although proof not usually requested). As a tourist you are entitled to 30 days, however depending on the immigration official you may be allocated less days. You will probably be asked to fill out an immigration card. A copy of this card should stay in your passport until you exit the country.

Money

The monetary unit in Costa Rica is the Costa Rican colon. For up-to-date exchange rates with your own currency visit www.oanda.com or www.xe.com.

Often the easiest way to obtain local currency is to use the ATMs (‘cajeros automaticos’) located in San José (finding an ATM that will accept your card can be very difficult in the rest of Costa Rica). Visa, Plus and Cirrus/Maestro are accepted in most ATMs in San José, as long as you have a four-digit pin. Some ATMs will give you US dollars OR local currency, however you should not rely on this.

Although bank cards are often the easiest way to go, there are times where they will not work for you even if your bank at home tells you it will! Do not rely on your card as your only source of money. Always have a few back-ups with you.

Credit cards are accepted in some shops/restaurants/hotels. The most accepted credit card is Visa, although authorisation can sometimes be denied due to poor computer connections or other problems. Note there may sometimes be commission charged when paying by credit card (up to 8%).and you will often get a discount if paying by cash instead.

Traveller’s cheques can be very time-consuming to cash in Costa Rica. If you choose to take them, make sure they are in US dollars and ‘American Express’ cheques (they are by far the most widely accepted).

San José is the easiest place (and sometimes the only place) for you stock up on money. There is no restriction on the amount of foreign currency that you may bring into Costa Rica, however very large sums should be declared on arrival.

Remember that once out of Costa Rica you will generally not be able to use or exchange colones (except at the border towns). Therefore you must make sure you spend/exchange/donate any left-over money before leaving the country.

Security

Crime in Latin America is not as bad as its reputation as long as you are sensible and alert. Costa Rica is one of the safer countries in Central America but like anywhere in the world, you can be in the wrong place at the wrong time. Care should be taken, especially whilst walking around the larger cities. Try to keep away from dark quiet areas if on your own, particularly late at night and try to always take a taxi. We suggest that whenever possible you leave all of your important documents in the safe (“caja fuertes”). However you should always carry some form of ID or a photocopy of your passport.

Local Food and Drink

There’s a lot of different food to choose from in Costa Rica and travellers are often surprised by the quality and variety on offer. This is partly due to the number of ex-pats who have opened up a range of different international restaurants. There is also local cuisine to suit every budget.

Local cuisine is simple, tasty and not too spicy, but heavy on oil at times. “Gallo pinto”, the national dish of fried rice and black beans is commonly served with breakfast. A gallo pinto made in coconut milk (on the Caribbean side) is particularly good.

At lunch gallo pinto becomes “casado” – rice and beans supplemented with cabbage and tomato salad, fried platains and meat. Other common meals include “arroz con pollo” (rice with chicken) or “arroz con atun” (with tuna). Vegetables do not form a large part of the diet, but there is always salad.

If you are a strict vegetarian you may experience a distinct lack of variety in the food available, especially in small towns. You might find that you are eating a lot of omelettes and other egg dishes. Our tour leaders will do their best to provide interesting vegetarian alternatives when arranging group meals in the campsite, but your patience and understanding is requested.

All drinks such as water, soft or alcoholic drinks are at your own expense at all times.

You should be wary of drinking the local tap water. Bottled water and carbonated soft drinks are widely available and are generally safe to drink.

If you only learn one word in Spanish it’s bound to be “Cerveza.” There are countless lagers, and a few dark beers. The most common are Bavaria and Imperial.

Costa Rica has no national drink, but “horchata”, a cinnamon flavoured cornmeal drink, “chan”, a slimy drink made of seeds, and “fresco de frutas”, a fruit salad floating on a base of cola and water are very popular. Also popular is “guaro”, a clear spirit distilled from fermented sugarcane which is almost tasteless, yet very potent.

Time Difference

The time difference in Costa Rica is GMT/UTC -6. For other time differences please visit www.timeanddate.com

Voltage

110 volts, US-style two pronged plugs

Website & Online Bookings by Metafour

Login